Bunny Island Rabbitry - More

The Language of the Rabbit Show Table
(used with permission of Eric Tudor of Riverwind Rabbitry)

In an ARBA Sanctioned and Judged Show:
   
    BOB - Best of Breed - Judged the best rabbit of that breed.
   
    BOS - Best Opposite Sex - Judged the best of the opposite sex of the BOB rabbit. For example, if a doe wins BOB, then the judge will choose the best buck for the BOS.
   
    BOV - Best Of Variety - The rabbit judged best of its variety. "Variety" is the same as "color" in most breeds. Some breeds only come in one color, and BOV does not apply. "Variety" can mean something else in some breeds. In Angoras, all whites are shown together, and BOV is the designation for the Best White. All colors are shown together, and BOV is the designation for the Best Colored. The Lop breeds have a similar situation, but their varieties are designated as being either Solid or Broken.
   
    BOSV - Best Opposite Sex of Variety - Judged the best rabbit of the opposite sex of the BOV rabbit.
   
    BOG - Best Of Group - In some breeds, varieties are lumped together, and shown in groups (Harlequin and Jersey Wooly), or first shown in individual varieties, then the best of each group is chosen (Netherland Dwarf).
   
    BOSG - Best Opposite Sex of Group - Judged the best rabbit of the opposite sex of the BOG rabbit.
   
    Best 4-Class - Judged the best rabbit of all the breeds that have four showroom classes. The four classes being: Senior buck, senior doe, junior buck, and junior doe. This is an optional award.
   
    Best 6-Class - Judged the best rabbit of all the breeds that have six showroom classes. The six classes being: Senior buck, senior doe, intermediate (also called 6-8) buck, intermediate (also called 6-8) doe, junior buck, and junior doe. Some of these breeds also have a pre-junior class, which is not counted. This is an optional award.
   
    BIS - Best In Show - Judged as the best rabbit in the rabbit show. BIS may be chosen by comparing all the BOB winners, or a Best 4-Class and a Best 6-Class may be chosen first, and the BIS chosen from these two winners. Another method, is to designate several groups, with several breeds in each group, choose a Best of each Group, then choose BIS from the group winners. Usually, only very large shows use this method. All shows are required to choose a BIS.
   
    RIS - Reserve In Show - Judged the second best rabbit in the show. This is an optional award. If a Best 4-Class and a Best 6-Class are chosen first, the RIS is the one not chosen for BIS.
   
    Runner-up BIS - Same as RIS. Termonology may be different in different areas of the country.
   
In a 4-H or Non-ARBA Sanctioned Show:
   
    Champion - Judged the best rabbit in a certain "group" of rabbits, as designated by the show committee. Rabbits may be grouped by breed, or some other criteria, such as "fancy" and "commercial", "all other breeds", "grade", "meat pen", "single fryer", etc.
   
    Reserve Champion - Judged the best of the opposite sex of the Champion rabbit. For instance, if a doe wins Champion, then the judge will choose the best buck for the Reserve Champion. Except, in meat pen or single fryer, Reserve Champion is the second place pen or rabbit, regardless of sex.
   
    Grand Champion - Judged as the best rabbit in the show, or a certain part of the show. This award is chosen by comparing all of the Champion rabbits. Meat pens and single fryers are usually divided from "breeding" classes, so two or more Grand Champions may be awarded in a show.
   
    Reserve Grand Champion - Judged as the best of the opposite sex of the Grand Champion rabbit. Except, in meat pen or single fryer, Reserve Grand Champion is the second place pen or rabbit, regardless of sex.
   
    The above terms are common all across the US. But be aware that in 4-H and non-ARBA sanctioned shows, the show sponsor is free to make rules, and award placements as they see fit, so there could be variations.
   
ARBA Terms:
   
    Grand Champion - A rabbit who has won at least three "Leg" papers (under at least 2 different ARBA judges, and with at least one win as an intermediate or senior), is registered, and has obtained a Grand Champion Certificate, with a Grand Champion number, from ARBA.
   
    Pedigreed - A rabbit who has a written record of at least three generations of ancestors. This information should include name and/or ear number, weight and color, plus any other information available, such as winnings, registration numbers, and Grand Champion numbers. A pedigree form is made out by the breeder of the rabbit. A pedigreed rabbit is usually a purebred, but not necessarily. A pedigeed rabbit usually has a tattoo in its left ear, which corresponds to the ear number on its pedigree paper.
   
    Registered - A rabbit who is purebred, fully pedigreed, has passed the inspection of an ARBA Registrar, and has received a Registration Certificate and number from ARBA. A registered rabbit should have a number or circled "R" tattooed in its right ear.
   
    Leg - An official certificate issued by a Show Secretary, designating a certain win. In all cases, a leg will only be issued if there are at least 5 rabbits competing for that particular win, with at least 3 breeders of those rabbits. A "Leg" may be awarded for First Place in a class, BOB, BOS, BOV, BOSV, BOG, BOSG, or BIS. A rabbit can only get one Leg per show.
   
RABBIT JUDGING JARGON:
   
    What is a LEG and what does it mean in rabbit judging? (By Betty Chu)
    The first time I went to a rabbit show, I saw a teenager holding a cute rabbit. I commented, "That is a nice rabbit!" She answered, "Oh yes, she has two legs."
    I looked and looked; this rabbit had four legs on its body, I couldn't figure out why she said they rabbit had only two. Recently, I was in a rabbit show. Two ladies came by and wanted to buy one of my bunnies. I said, "Both of his parents are grand champions. His papa has six legs and his mama has five legs." They gave me a blank stare. I realized then that they were as confused as I was years ago when I first attended a rabbit show.
   
    Here is how it works, you enter your breed of rabbit in a show, along with other breeders of the same breed. Unless all the rabbits entered are unworthy of an award, the judge usually will place the animals from the last to the first. If the class has at least five rabbits shown and these five rabbits are entered by three or more different exhibitors, the first place rabbit gets a leg. Disqualifications are counted in the number of animals shown except when a wrong sex is entered, such as, a buck is entered as a doe. If there are two white senior bucks and three white junior bucks entered, the first place senior buck and the first junior buck do not get a leg automatically after winning the first place. However, provided that these five white bucks are entered by three or more exhibitors, if the first place white junior buck wins over the senior, the junior wins a leg, the senior doesn't, and vice versa. If one white senior buck, one white junior buck, two white senior does and one white junior doe are shown, of these four classes, only the Best White wins a leg if these five rabbits are entered by three or more exhibitors.
   
    During the show, a judge will select in each variety the first place winner of the senior buck, junior buck, senior doe and junior doe, usually in this order. In the same variety, the senior buck will be compared against the junior buck and the winner stays on the table. The senior doe will be compared against the junior doe, the winner stays. Then the winner buck will be judged against the winner doe. The winner of the two will be the Best of Variety (BOV) and the other will be the Best Opposite Sex of the Variety (BOSV). At this time, there should be four rabbits on the table, a colored buck, a colored doe, a white buck and a white doe. The Best White will be judged against the Best Colored and the winner is the Best of Breed (BOB). If the Best of Breed winner is a doe, then the two remaining bucks will be compared and the winner is the Best Opposite Sex of the Breed (BOS). If the BOB winner is a buck, then the two remaining does will be compared for the BOS.
   
    To summarize, it takes at least five rabbits and three exhibitors to qualify a leg for one rabbit. If a rabbit wins three legs which were awarded by at least two different judges, with at least one leg being a senior leg, and this rabbit is registered by an ARBA licensed registrar, this rabbit qualifies to become a Grand Champion. The owner mails the three original leg certificates with registration number and $4.00 to the secretary of the ARBA. The secretary of the ARBA will send back a Grand Champion Certificate with a grand champion number assigned to this rabbit. One rabbit qualifies for one grand champion certificate in his lifetime. An owner still can show this rabbit after being "granded", the legs earned after that are just for the honor rather than working toward the certificate. (note: I added italics and underline in last paragraph.)
   

BUNNY ISLAND RABBITRY
We want to thank the following people who have helped us!
- Jody Rosnik sold us our first Tri Mini Rex rabbit, “Trillion.”
- Liz Nichols of Rose Rabbitry offered wonderful help and advice with getting us on the right course with quality Mini Rex.
- We bought some great Mini Rex rabbits from Liz Nichols, Shannon Fizer of Cambridge Rabbitry, Jane Delling of Baty’s Rabbitry, Lynn and Bob Layne of Shawn Bob’s Rabbit Ranch, Justin Blake Barbee of 2nd Tri's Rabbitry and Kathy Tellechea of KT's Bunny Barn.
- Note: We no longer breed Mini Rex. Our focus now is on the Chinchilla variety in the Dutch breed.
- Bob Bergene sold us our first Chinchilla Dutch (2016). His video and rabbitry website (see links page) are very informative.
- Also, many thanks to Kay Miller for all her help with health issues, fostering and being there to answer lots of rabbit questions!!

For more information, please e-mail therese@westsidepioneer.com or call 719-473- 4143.

Happy Homes!

B.I's Thumper & Makenna (Brkn Blk Otter: G.C./R.G.C.)

Olivia and Peony (Broken Blue Otter).

Caitlin and Josie (Blue Otter Tort - Fox).

Byerly sisters with Alyse (Black) and Tianna (Broken Blue)

Makai and Amelia (Harlequin)




The Quest for Bunny Island
Copyright © 2013 by Westside Pioneer Publishing. All rights reserved.